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A Great Sunday Roast

Share your recipies, talk fooooood.

A Great Sunday Roast

Postby MrsHutch » Fri Aug 17, 2007 5:26 pm

Okay so hubby and I have made up our minds that we are moving to America by obvious filing and stuff, but the one thing I will miss absolutely MISS is a GREAT SUNDAY ROAST.

I normally make a chicken one and use the PAX Sage and Onion Stuffing but I want to know how in Gods name, have any of you keep this tradition? And if so how have you coped with using American products as I absolutely detest Stove Top Stuffing? Also what about fresh veg such as savoy cabbages YUM! Seriously I have forgotten whether or not WalMart Superstore actually sells veg cause all I ever bought before my demise was takeaways from Taco Bell and KFC and beauty products from the drugstore. Then I got married and realised I actually have to cook.:D

So please, please enlighten me with your shopping list for the GREAT SUNDAY ROAST AND RECIPES, because I plan to continue this tradition when I land in Orlando (obviously I will leave it for the more winter months as it will be cooler);)
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Postby lplkemc » Fri Aug 17, 2007 5:50 pm

Well, I plan on continuing sunday roasts - although some might disagree with me about it being a roast.

I normally do a beef joint in the slow cooker - so that will be easy enough. The part that I have always failed miserably at is making Yorkshire Puddings that rise - so I have been using Aunt Bessies already puffed ones. I will either end up making Neiman Marcus popovers (basically a reverse yorkshire pudding as it puffs way out) or see if my hubby can manage them better.
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Postby Frances » Fri Aug 17, 2007 6:42 pm

We were never big on doing roasts every week. With Paul being a vegetarian, there was never a big push from my end to do it full-on. So, in Scotland we would do roast veg and potatoes, mashed potatoes, cabbage, and other veggies, with gravy and Yorkshire puddings. We do the same thing here in the states every so often.

As for Paxo, you can get it in import stores or buy it on line. It costs a bit more, but it's not too outrageous. Same with Bisto gravies. Of course, you can make homemade stuffing, too.

Can't tell you if Wal*Mart sells veg, because I don't go there. But every town you go to will have a grocery store with produce, and many towns have farmers' markets in the summer months. You can even plant your own garden.

Sunday roasts have long been traditions in American families from coast to coast. The menu may look a bit different, but the over all idea is the same. You may find that you have to blend the American and British roasts to make it work, but if you are determined to do it, you'll figure it out.
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Postby Liddy » Fri Aug 17, 2007 8:59 pm

We've carried on the tradition, just not as regularly as it seems that we are not home too regularly on Sundays (longer trading hours, closer to family, etc). I don't eat red meat so tend to roast a chicken with lots of veggies, and occasionally potatoes. Hubby would order lamb or beef once in a great while if we went out for Sunday lunch, and he'll still do so if we go out here.

We get most of our veg at the farmer's market (2 blocks from our house, every Sat) or the grocery and have no issues finding what we like. We are not stuffing people really, except on Thanksgiving and I make that from scratch.

You'll be able to find what you need, or close substitutions. For anything 'hard to find' you can probably find it...just might cost a bit more. Our grocery stores (meijer and kroger) both have International sections with British food and I've seen bisto, pax, colemans's, etc mixed in with the digestives and jaffa cakes.

If it's a tradition that's important to you then you'll make it work. We loved the tradition of Sunday morning papers and breaky before heading out for the day, and that's something we try to do when possibe (even going so far as to subscribe to UK papers, which we won't renew as after one year we find we read online instead).
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Postby cranners99 » Sat Aug 18, 2007 3:46 am

Erica,

If you get down to FL then have a look in Publix, they are a grocery chain based in Lakeland FL and each store has a British section. I was able to get hold of a tub of Birds Custard powder for $4.99 where the British 'specialty' shops in the tourist Kissimee area ask for a few $ more.

You can always doctor up 'Stove Top' with dried sage and onion. Use it as you have been the Paxo stuff, some hot water, butter and your seasonings, then bake it to dry it out more then the US style would serve.

There are lots or recipes for 'Yorkies" from scratch on the net, the real trick is to chill the batter before use, but have the pan and grease hot...a bit like corn bread.

I'n not a chef, but I know waht I Like

HTH
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Postby geally » Sat Aug 18, 2007 1:02 pm

Don't use stove top (although, in my personal experience it is what children prefer!), pepperidge farm dried stuffing mix is wonderful, you can doctor it up anyway you want.

I grew up in New England...the large Sunday dinner (usually with roast beef or roast chicken with all the fixings, and drippings) was the norm in most homes (ok...this was the 60's and 70's!) and I think the Sunday dinner is still alive and kicking in some form or another most places. Even if it isn't a proper Sunday roast, it is usually a larger fare with family or guests and a special pudding!

Before moving to the UK I never knew pre-made yorkshire puddings existed! To tell you the truth, I haven't looked to see if they exist here in VA. When I make yorkshire puddings, I make my own...really not too hard and it doesn't matter what shape they take if you smother them in enough butter and gravy! :D

Oh...and the WalMarts I have shopped at usually have a varied vegetable section.
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Postby Sarah » Sun Aug 19, 2007 3:33 pm

We were never really good at doing Sunday Roast - that is, we didnt do it every week. When we did do it, it was FANTASTIC. That hasnt changed, Martin cooks a mean chicken.

We dont use stove top either. I can get PAX in the supermarket in the British foods section (big Brit population down here), and if Im in the wrong shop I'll pick up Mrs Cubbison's Dressing (big cream colored box), which works the same way as PAX and tastes just as good. Also, around the holiday season Williams Sonoma carries some great ciabatta stuffing packets which are really really good.

Believe me, you'll find american equivilents for almost everything without sacrificing flavor / quality. Challenge butter is a good example of that, though if you want to spend the money you can almost always find Kerry Gold in the butter or cheese section. The only exceptions Ive found to this rule so far are Bacon (British bacon just cannot be substituted) and Cheese. The cheese issue is a big one - Vermont cheese, for example, is very good and even the imported stuff will do; but even the best American Cheese and the most expensive import from the grocery store wont get you that genuine British cheese potency.

Everything else though, you'll be able to find the British food or a very decent replacement. Your Sunday Roasts will be a fantastic reminder of home, even without the PAX.
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Postby AmericanWoman » Sun Aug 19, 2007 9:16 pm

[quote="geally"]Don't use stove top (although, in my personal experience it is what children prefer!), pepperidge farm dried stuffing mix is wonderful, you can doctor it up anyway you want.

I grew up in New England...the large Sunday dinner (usually with roast beef or roast chicken with all the fixings, and drippings) was the norm in most homes (ok...this was the 60's and 70's!) and I think the Sunday dinner is still alive and kicking in some form or another most places. Even if it isn't a proper Sunday roast, it is usually a larger fare with family or guests and a special pudding!QUOTE]

Yummy, Pepperidge farm stuffing mix! I grew up in New England too and always had sunday dinner with the family. My mom makes a mean roast beef dinner with all the fixings.

We dont always do sunday dinner here in the UK - usually just the weekends when the children are with us - but they always beg me to cook a turkey! Do you know how it is to find turkeys here in the UK? LOL

I'm looking forward to having one of my moms family dinners when I move back.
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Postby MrsHutch » Mon Aug 20, 2007 5:08 pm

TURKEY! Trying to find a good turkey in England is so hard. hubby told me alot of people eat goose on Christmas Day but I prefer a good turkey YUM!
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Postby Mrs. M. » Fri Aug 24, 2007 4:37 pm

Well I am a vegetarian and before then I did a Sunday roast on a Thursday for DH birthday last year and I have discovered that find no joy in being in a kitchen all day (yeck NO Betty Crocker here). I have too many other things going on during the day to be in a kitchen. To me is seems way to 1950ish for a woman to be in a kitchen all day. My SIL (the one we are temporarly sharing the house with) on the other hand she is the cook! She is actually in the kitchen now cooking up a storm (she does not cook for DH and I).

I never had too many proper family dinners growing up. We always ate in front of the TV since I was born, my parents found watching TV whild eating dinner was very important especially the news (absoulety no talking during meal times). I find families eating at the dinner table every night and having conversation very odd!
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Postby Sheril » Wed Sep 05, 2007 3:20 am

As a Paxo freak - after almost 2 yrs here, I have actually found I much prefer "Bells Stuffing" (you will probably all be familiar with Bell's seasoning - the stuffing is yummy - still prefer the texture of the Paxo (done in balls in the oven) but flavor of Bells much better.

I think out of anything I still truly miss, it's a good hearty english roast (or pub carvery). I can actually buy Paxo in both local supermarkets here - pricey for a small box and my dad sent me about 6 boxes once (including all the limited editions they do st Christmas and they sat here and sat here until we gave them to a Brit friend and threw the rest away,

Would never imagine I'd say that - or that I have also gone off Cadbury's..... :)
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Postby MrsHutch » Wed Sep 12, 2007 2:50 pm

Yes Sheril there is nothing like Paxo stuffing...yum...I tell you, I will WILL WILL preserver (sorry if spelling is wrong) to continue the GREAT BRITISH SUNDAY ROAST with vigour!
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what US cut of beef to buy for Sunday roast?

Postby kreadew » Wed Feb 20, 2008 11:00 pm

When I was recently in the UK visiting family, my stepbrother made several wonderful roast dinners, and I've been trying to replicate them at home. Roast chicken and pork roasts are easy enough to come by...but what cut of beef should I roast? My stepbrother said he used brisket--but every brisket I've ever purchased (or seen) in the US was a large flat slab, not a the loaf-of-bread shaped cut that I associate with the Great Sunday Roast. My cookbook recommends the horrendously expensive standing rib roast or a tenderloin and I KNOW my stepbrother didn't shell out those kinds of pounds (nor did the roast he produced taste or look like either cut). So what do you expats buy to make a beef Great Sunday Roast? Advice?
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Postby CanaryGirl » Thu Feb 21, 2008 2:14 am

We use either eye of round or sirloin tip roast for our roast beef and they're both delicious.
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Postby lplkemc » Thu Feb 21, 2008 7:22 am

The brisket your BIL used is the same flat slab you see in the states. It is just rolled up! I use brisket quite often for our sunday roasts and they are rolled up and tied with string, fat on the top. In fact, if it is prepacked it says "Rolled Brisket".

Either get your butcher (most probably at the supermarket) to roll it, or ask them which string is suitable to use for cooking.

Good luck!!!
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Postby Birdy » Thu Feb 21, 2008 7:25 am

ok stop with the roast talk i dont have time to do one for breakfast :)
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Postby Frances » Thu Feb 21, 2008 5:00 pm

Oh ... a nice roasted brisket sounds so very lovely.
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Postby lplpaca » Thu Feb 21, 2008 5:54 pm

Hmmm, MMMMMMMMMMMMMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm - sorry another Homer moment - I will be getting my meat fix with a bowl of 'scouse' tonight - still jealous of that birthday steak though! :)

For those who want to know what scouse is - clickety click
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Postby AnnieRose » Wed Dec 11, 2013 10:03 am

geally wrote:
I grew up in New England...the large Sunday dinner (usually with roast beef or roast chicken with all the fixings, and drippings) was the norm in most homes (ok...this was the 60's and 70's!) and I think the Sunday dinner is still alive and kicking in some form or another most places. Even if it isn't a proper Sunday roast, it is usually a larger fare with family or guests and a special pudding!



Great to know! I miss them now, and I am only in Germany ...=/
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